10 Ways to Avoid a Heart Attack

By , December 30, 2014 10:26 pm

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A heart attack is known as a myocardial infarction. This occurs when the heart muscle is damaged or does not receive enough oxygen. Many cardiac related problems occur due to blockages in arteries that carry purified blood away from the heart to different parts of the body. Another cause is the formation of blood clots.

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A heart attack is known as a myocardial infarction. This occurs when the heart muscle is damaged or does not receive enough oxygen. Many cardiac related problems occur due to blockages in arteries that carry purified blood away from the heart to different parts of the body. Another cause is the formation of blood clots.

Very often, it is quite difficult to differentiate between a heart attack and heartburn. The common signs of a heart attack are a tightness, pain, or discomfort in the chest. Sweating, nausea, and vomiting that are accompanied by intense pressure in the chest. A radiating and intense pain in the chest that extends from the chest to the left arm. A shortness of breath for more than a few minutes. If you have any of the above you must consult the doctor or go to the emergency rooms.

If you even think you are having a heart attack you must call for a cardiac care ambulance, and put under your tongue a sorbitrate or chew an aspirin. If you are allergic to aspirin don’t take one. At the hospital care will include rapid thrombolysis, cardiac catheterization, and angioplasty. They will also administer intravenously clot busting medications.

The risk factors for a heart attack include: smoking, diabetes, high levels of cholesterol, hypertension, family history of heart diseases, atherosclerosis, lack of exercise, obesity, and fast foods.

Reduce the risks of a heart attack by:

1. Quitting smoking.

2. Eating healthy. Avoid fatty foods, excess salt, and red meats.

3. Controlling high blood pressure and diabetes.

4. Ensuring regular exercise at least 30 minutes a day. Walking is most beneficial.

5. Preventing obesity. Doing all you can to maintain weight.

6. Choosing to live a healthy lifestyle.

7. Practicing meditation.

8. Doing regular relaxation and breathing exercises.

9. Undergoing periodic cardiac evaluations.

10. Including foods that are rich in anti-oxidants in your diet.

A killer disease, according to the American Heart Association approximately 58.8 million people in the US suffer from heart diseases. And, about 950,000 Americans die of heart ailments each year. Heart diseases and death from it can be prevented by maintaining your health. Find a balance in life between work and other activities, abandon the couch for the outdoors, don’t watch sports on television play sports instead and you can hope to live a long and fulfilled life.

Be a well informed and caring citizen, read all about heart diseases and preventive care at: University of Maryland Heart Center for Preventive Cardiology –http://www.umm.edu/heart/preventive.html; or the American Heart Association –http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=1200000; or the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion — http://www.cdc.gov/doc.do/id/0900f3ec802720b8/ .

The norm prevention is better than cure could lead a whole nation towards good health and well being.

A More Convenient Approach To Heart Health

By , December 28, 2014 11:01 am

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Here’s news many Americans can take to heart. In addition to diet and exercise, there is a new heart health product with aspirin available to help reduce heart disease risk factors.

A More Convenient Approach To Heart Health

Here’s news many Americans can take to heart. In addition to diet and exercise, there is a new heart health product with aspirin available to help reduce heart disease risk factors.

Cardiovascular disease poses a major health threat to both men and women in the U.S. According to the American Heart Association, more than 71 million adults in the U.S. have at least one type of cardiovascular disease. These include dysfunctional conditions of the heart, arteries and veins that supply oxygen to life-sustaining areas of the body such as the brain, the heart itself and other vital organs.

These conditions can be caused by a buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries, elevated cholesterol, high blood pressure and poor circulation. Patients with cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for heart attacks, strokes and death.

A healthy diet and regular exercise are important steps in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition, a new and complete heart health product has been developed that combines the known benefits of doctor-recommended, low-dose aspirin with heart health vitamins and other supplements. These ingredients have been clinically shown to reduce the chances of heart attack and stroke, and may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels and help manage other cardio risk factors.

Called CardioEA™ Enhanced with Aspirin, each safety-coated caplet contains 81 mg of doctor-recommended, low-dose aspirin plus a complex of vitamins B6, B12, Folic Acid, L-Arginine and Aged Garlic Extract™ (AGE). It provides heart health-conscious consumers with the opportunity to help manage many of the risk factors that contribute to heart disease with a single daily caplet instead of taking various supplements and aspirin every day.

This is the first in a new category of preventive and wellness products called OTCeuticals™, manufactured by the Alan James Group, a health care-focused consumer products company based in Boca Raton, Florida. OTCeuticals are vitamins, minerals, herbs and other supplements that are combined with FDA-monographed, Category 1 USP-grade ingredients in rational, safe, effective and convenient combinations.

In addition to CardioEA Enhanced with Aspirin, the Alan James Group’s OTCeuticals pipeline includes products for bone & joint and gastrointestinal health, among others.

CardioEA Enhanced with Aspirin is available in the vitamin section at most major supermarkets, chain drug and discount retailers.

Cholesterol – Good, Bad…Huh?

By , December 26, 2014 12:28 am

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There is good cholesterol, and there’s bad. What’s the difference? Why are they important? We’ll cover some of that, and share some tips and ideas for controlling one’s cholesterol levels.

cholesterol

What IS Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that’s stored in the fat (lipid) content of one’s blood stream. It’s actually important to have a certain amount of “good” cholesterol in one’s system.

Cholesterol, and our other body fats, cannot dissolve in our blood. They must be transported by special carriers called lipoproteins. While there are numerous kinds (too many to cover here), the two that are most important are the high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low-density lipoproteins (LDL). There is a third kind, which is referred to as Lp(a), which can increase one’s risk of heart attack and stroke. We’ll cover that one here, as well.

HDL, LDL, & Lp(a)…What ARE These?

High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are known as “good cholesterol”. Most experts agree that HDL moves the cholesterol from the arteries to the liver, where it is broken down and leaves the body through the natural evacuation process. A higher HDL level seems to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. Keep in mind, though, that a lower HDL level in one’s body (-40 mg/dL in men, -50 mg d/L in women) is a warning signal of greater risk of one or both.

HDL seems to remove excess cholesterol from the plaques which build up in one’s blood vessels, thereby inhibiting or slowing their growth. This is what makes it so important to the human body. Approximately 1/3 to 1/4 of the cholesterol in our bodies is carried by the HDL.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are the major transporters of cholesterol in our blood. One can experience a build up on the walls of the arteries which supply blood to our hearts and brains, if too much LDL enters the blood stream. When combined with other substances, it forms plaques. Plaques are hard, thick coatings that can clog one’s arteries and decrease blood flow to the heart or the brain. Should the blood not move swiftly enough, there is danger of a blood clot forming near the plaques. When this occurs in the arteries leading to the heart, one is at greater risk of a heart attack. If it happens in the arteries which lead to one’s brain, there is a higher risk of stroke.

If one’s LDL level is 160 mg/dL or higher, this is an indication of a greater risk of heart disease. And if one has already been diagnosed with heart disease, it is strongly recommended that one maintain a level of less than 100 mg/dL.

A little known (by the general population) lipoprotein that can also cause a greater risk is the Lp(a) cholesterol lipoprotein. This is a generic variation of plasma (the “fluid” which carries the blood cells through one’s blood stream) LDL. When one’s Lp(a) level is higher, one can more quickly develop the plaque build up which physicians and specialists refer to as “arthersclerosis”. Although there has been no conclusive evidence drawn as to WHY Lp(a) contributes to the increased risk of heart disease, it is commonly believed that the natural lesions which occur in our artery walls may contain substances that interact with it. This may lead to the build up of the fatty deposits.

From Where Do We Get Cholesterol?

The general consensus is that the human body is capable of producing the cholesterol that one needs to remain healthy. The body – most especially the liver – produces roughly 1,000 mg per day. Therefore the cholesterol consumed (by the average person eating the typical foods such as whole milk dairy products, eggs, meat, poultry, fish and seafood) is not really necessary to maintain the healthy level which one needs.

Two of the biggest culprits which contribute to the excessive consumption of cholesterol are transfats and saturated fats. But other fats consumed in foods can also raise blood cholesterol. While some of the excess fat is removed from the body by the liver, most heart specialists recommend that the average person limit himself/herself to less than 300 mg daily. And if one has been diagnosed with heart disease, that level should be less than 200 mg daily. If one has been diagnosed with extremely high cholesterol, even more drastic measures may be necessary to bring it under control.

How Do I Control My Intake?

A proven and accepted measure of control is to limit one’s intake to no more that 6 ounces of lean meat/fish/poultry daily, and to consume only low fat/no fat dairy products. Effective substitutes for the protein necessary for good health can be found in beans and vegetables with high protein content. Two excellent sources for determining which foods have high protein content can be found at:

http://www.vegsoc.org/info/protein.htm and

http://www.vegparadise.com/protein.html#Charts

It is also recommended that one adopt a regular exercise regimen. Even a moderate amount of daily activity can help to increase the movement of blood through one’s body. Physical activities such as leisurely walking, gardening, light yard work, housework and slow dancing are often prescribed as ideally suited for those who need a daily routine to help control the cholesterol levels.

A more intense regimen can include brisk walking, jogging, swimming and weight-lifting. Aerobic exercising is an excellent way to increase one’s breathing and heart rates.

Side benefits of a regularly scheduled exercise program can include weight control, reducing one’s risk of developing diabetes, and helping to keep one’s blood pressure at a healthy level. Regular moderate to intense exercise can also help to strengthen one’s heart and lungs.

To Smoke or Not to Smoke…

Most physicians and specialists recommend that no one smoke. And it has been proven that tobacco smoking increases the risk of heart disease. One’s intake of oxygen, which is a necessary component for good vascular circulation and health, is drastically reduced. Plus, smoking is detrimental to HDL cholesterol levels and increases the possibility of blood clots, not to mention the risks of causing cancer in one’s body.

The Effects of Alcohol on Cholesterol Levels

The moderate consumption of alcohol has shown, in some studies, to actually promote higher HDL cholesterol levels. With that said one must weigh the risks of alcoholism, obesity, stroke, high blood pressure, some forms of cancer, and sometimes depression. Exercise moderation (not more than 1-2 drinks daily for men, not more than 1 drink daily for women). And if you don’t drink, don’t start. There are better and safer alternatives for controlling one’s cholesterol.

Synopsis:

– HDL is “good” cholesterol
– LDL is “bad” cholesterol
– An exercise regimen can help in lowering LDL and increasing HDL
– Cholesterol can be controlled with a sensible diet, for many people
– Smoking can increase the risks of lower HDL levels and the possibility of blood clots

Consult your physician or health care provider before embarking on any exercise regimen, or the consumption of alcohol, as a method to control one’s cholesterol. He or she can direct you to what steps you need to take in order to ensure the best results for your efforts.

Have an annual screening (usually a blood drawing) to determine your cholesterol levels. Be sure to discuss family history and other issues which your doctor may want to know before deciding whether or not you should be checked for the Lp(a) lipoproteins. He or she can better determine your risks, the diagnosis, and possible treatment (which may include prescription medication) when fully informed.

Cardio May Be a Waste of Time Without This Knowledge

By , December 23, 2014 1:03 pm

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Only by keeping track of your heart rate during a workout can you be sure that the intensity is enough to improve your cardiorespiratory fitness level. Your ability to monitor and interpret your heart rate is the single most important key to success in cardio training.

aerobic exercise, cardiorespiratory fitness

The most important factor for improving cardiorespiratory fitness (cardio or CR) is the intensity of the workout. Changes in CR fitness are directly related to how “hard” an aerobic exercise is performed. The more energy expended per unit of time, the greater the intensity of the exercise, the greater the effect on cardiorespiratory fitness.

You have to know how hard is “hard” to determine if an aerobic exercise like running is producing a CR training effect or if it’s just burning a few calories. The heart rate during work or exercise is an excellent indicator of how much effort you are exerting. Only by keeping track of your heart rate during a workout can you be sure that the intensity is enough to improve your CR fitness level. In other words, your ability to monitor your heart rate is the single most important key to success in CR training.

Training Heart Rate (THR) = Desired Intensity of the Workout

THR is the heart rate at which you need to exercise to get a training effect. The U.S. Army fitness gurus have given us two methods to determine THR. The first method, percent maximum heart rate (%MHR) is simpler to use, while the second method, percent heart rate reserve (%HRR) is more accurate.

%MHR Method

With this method the THR is figured using the estimated maximal heart rate. You can estimate your maximum heart rate (MHR) by subtracting your age from 220. Thus, a 20 year old would have an estimated maximum heart rate (MHR) of 200 beats per minute (220 – 20 = 200).

A person who is in poor shape should exercise at 70 percent of his MHR; if he is in relatively good shape, at 80 percent MHR; and, if he is in excellent shape, at 90 percent MHR.

Examples:

A 20 year old in good physical condition would have a THR of 160 beats per minute (BPM). 220 – 20 = 200 * .80 = 160 BPM.

A 30 year old in good physical condition would have a THR of 152 beats per minute (BPM). 220 – 30 = 190 * .80 = 152 BPM.

A 40 year old in poor physical condition would have a THR of 126 beats per minute (BPM). 220 – 40 = 180 * .70 = 126 BPM.

%HRR Method

A more accurate way to calculate THR is the %HRR method. The range from 60 to 90 %HRR is the THR range in which people should exercise to improve their CR fitness levels. If you know your general level of CR fitness, you can determine which percentage of HRR is a good starting point

for you. For example, a person in excellent physical condition could start at 85 percent of his HRR; if he is in reasonably good shape, at 70 percent HRR; and, if he is in poor shape, at 60 percent HRR.

Most CR workouts should be conducted with the heart rate between 70 to 75 percent HRR to attain, or maintain, an adequate level of fitness. A person who has reached a high level of fitness may derive more benefit from working at a higher percentage of HRR, particularly if he cannot find more than 20 minutes for CR exercise.

Exercising at any lower percentage of HRR than 60 does not give the heart, muscles, and lungs an adequate training stimulus. Exercising at more than 90 percent can be dangerous. Before anyone begins aerobic training, he should know his THR (the heart rate at which he needs to exercise to get a training effect).

The example below shows how to figure the THR by using the resting heart rate (RHR) and age to estimate heart rate reserve (HRR). A 20 year old in reasonably good physical shape is the example.

STEP 1: Determine the MHR by subtracting your age from 220. i.e. MHR = 220 – 20 = 200.

STEP 2: Determine the resting heart rate (RHR) in beats per minute (BPM) by counting the resting pulse for 30 seconds, and multiply the count by two. A shorter period can be used, but a 30 second count is more accurate. This count should be taken while you are completely relaxed and rested. For this example we use a RHR of 69 BPM.

STEP 3: Determine the heart rate reserve (HRR) by subtracting the RHR from the estimate MHR. i.e. HRR = 200 – 69 = 131 BPM

STEP 4: Calculate THR by (1) multiplying HRR by the relative fitness level as a percentage and (2) adding the result to the HRR. For example, our 20 year old in good physical condition will exercise at 70% HRR.

(1) .70 * 131 = 91.7
(2) 91.7 + 69 = 160.7

In summary, a reasonably fit 20-year-old with a resting heart rate (RHR) of 69 BPM has a training heart rate (THR) goal of 161 BPM.

During aerobic exercise, the body will usually have reached a “Steady State” after five minutes of exercise, and the heart rate will have leveled off. At this time and, immediately after exercising, is when you should monitor your heart rate to see if you are within your desired THR range.

If your pulse rate is below the THR, you must exercise harder to increase your pulse to the THR. If your pulse is above the THR, you should reduce the intensity to reduce the pulse rate to the THR goal.

Blood Pressure Monitors ?Why You Should Consider Monitoring At Home

By , December 21, 2014 1:48 am

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Of all the organs of our body the heart is without doubt the most critical and rightly so as, if it stops pumping blood around the body and delivering vital oxygen to the other organs, including the brain, death will occur very quickly.

Despite its importance however many of us pay little if any attention to the health of our heart until forced to do so, when it is often too late. And yet keeping a check on the heart by simple routine measurement of our blood pressure coul…

blood pressure monitors, normal blood pressure, systolic, diastolic

Of all the organs of our body the heart is without doubt the most critical and rightly so as, if it stops pumping blood around the body and delivering vital oxygen to the other organs, including the brain, death will occur very quickly.

Despite its importance however many of us pay little if any attention to the health of our heart until forced to do so, when it is often too late. And yet keeping a check on the heart by simple routine measurement of our blood pressure could not be easier.

As with most things in life, if the heart starts to run into problems then there will be warning signs giving us time to take remedial action and these warning signs often come in the form of abnormally high or low blood pressure.

The principle role of the heart is to take freshly oxygenated blood and pump it through the main arteries and then through a network of smaller blood vessels to all parts of the body. As the heart contracts forcing blood out into the arteries pressure is exerted on the walls of the arteries. Then, as the heart relaxes and its chambers refill ready to pump again the pressure in the arteries falls.

By measuring these two pressure levels we can get an indication of just how well the heart is pumping blood around the body and thus see whether or not it is working normally.

Until quite recently it was necessary to visit the doctor’s office to have your blood pressure measured. The doctor would place a cuff around your upper arm roughly at the level of the heart. He would then place his stethoscope over the brachial artery where it runs close to the surface of the skin on the inside of your arm at the elbow and proceed to inflate the cuff.

As the cuff is inflated it tightens around the arm preventing blood from flowing through the brachial artery. The pressure in the cuff, which is indicated by a mercury manometer attached to the cuff, is slowly released and the point at which blood starts flowing through the artery, and which the doctor hears as a “whoosing” sound through his stethoscope, is noted. This is the point at which the pressure in the cuff equals the pressure in the artery as the heart pumps blood through it and is known as the systolic pressure.

The doctor then continues to slowly release the pressure in the cuff and to monitor the sound of blood being pumped through the artery until no sound at all is detected. At this point the manometer indicates the pressure in the artery as the heart is at rest and refilling ready to pump again. This lower pressure is known as the diastolic pressure.

Blood pressure will vary from person to person and will also rise and fall within each of us depending on a variety of factors such as the time of day, our level of activity, whether we are feeling stressed, our general state of health and whether or not we are currently taking particular forms of medication.

For the average person at rest however systolic blood pressure will be around 120 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) and diastolic blood pressure will be 80 mm Hg. As an indication of the degree of variation between individuals, and within any one person, the normal range of systolic pressure is considered to be 90 ?135 mm Hg and the normal range of diastolic pressure is 50 ?90 mm Hg.

If your blood pressure falls outside these readings, then your doctor will need to investigate further to discover why your blood pressure in either unusually high or unusually low.

Since most of us do not visit the doctor on a regular basis, and only venture into the surgery when we absolutely have to, it can often be many months, or even years, between blood pressure checks and we could well be walking around blissfully unaware that we have a time bomb ticking away inside us.

Today however there is a whole range of very simple to operate and relatively inexpensive blood pressure monitors available for use in our own homes and absolutely no reason at all for not keeping a regular eye on our most valuable organ.

So, before tragedy strikes either you or one of your loved ones, why not take a few minutes to check out the range of blood pressure monitors available and buy yourself some peace of mind.

Cardio Exercises-Low Or High Intensity Exercise Burn Body Fat Faster?

By , December 18, 2014 2:59 pm

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Have you ever wondered which cardio exercises are best for burning off extra body fat? Is walking (low intensity) better or running (high intensity) better for burning body fat?

Well, both low and high intensity exercises will help you burn off body fat. The question is which is more effective and burn more body fat. What is your fat burning zone?

When scientists first reported that during intensive exercises, your body burn glycogen, which is a form of stored carbohyd…

cardio exercises, burn fat, burn calories, low intensity, high intensity, aerobic exercises

Have you ever wondered which cardio exercises are best for burning off extra body fat? Is walking (low intensity) better or running (high intensity) better for burning body fat?

Well, both low and high intensity exercises will help you burn off body fat. The question is which is more effective and burn more body fat. What is your fat burning zone?

When scientists first reported that during intensive exercises, your body burn glycogen, which is a form of stored carbohydrates stored in your liver and muscles for energy and during low intensive exercises, your body burn body fat, everyone suddenly change their workout routines to perform low intensity exercises to burn body fat.

Does it work? Obviously it does not work because there are still so many fat people around although they are working out with low intensity exericies isn’t it? Why is that so?

Well, the scientists were right when they said that our bodies burn more body fat during low intensity exercises like walking or a leisurely swim. But during a high intensity exercise like running, our bodies burn a lot more calories. Even if some of the calories burnt are from glycogen, we will still burn many fat calories as well.

To add icing to the cake, when your store of glycogen is low, the carbs from your meal you eat later gets converted into glycogen to fill up the store and will not be converted to body fat when left unused for energy.

Furthermore, high intensity cardio exercises crank up your metabolism even after your workout is done. This means that you body will continue to burn body fat hours after you have left the gym. This effect is almost non existent in low intensity cardio or aerobic workout. Accumulatively, your body burns up many many more calories during and after high intensity cardio exercises than lower intensive ones.

You can inject high intensity exercises to your cardio workout by introducing some interval training. You can walk briskly for 5 minutes, then breaking into a jog for another 5 minutes. Then walking briskly again until you caught your breath and then sprint for a minute before walking again for another minute. From this point, alternate between a sprint and a walk, a minute each and do this for the next 15 minutes and you are done.

Do this for 5 days a week and before long, you will be steadily losing unwanted body fat and weight healthily and naturally.

Nature Made Cholest-Off Plus, mg, Softgels 450 200

By , December 16, 2014 2:48 pm

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Controlling High Blood Pressure Is The Easiest Thing To Do

By , December 16, 2014 3:52 am

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Controlling blood pressure is the easiest thing to do, provided you know the fundamentals. It has to do much with your eating and drinking habits.

Look into the mirror. Do not see only your face. Look at your entire figure. There lies your future. How long do you think your body can go on accepting all that you stuff in, without applying any thought, just because your taste-buds like it? Do you know that overweight people have a higher chance of suffering from a stroke? Do…

controlling blood pressure, control high blood pressure, high blood pressure management

Controlling blood pressure is the easiest thing to do, provided you know the fundamentals. It has to do much with your eating and drinking habits.

Look into the mirror. Do not see only your face. Look at your entire figure. There lies your future. How long do you think your body can go on accepting all that you stuff in, without applying any thought, just because your taste-buds like it? Do you know that overweight people have a higher chance of suffering from a stroke? Do you check your weight at regular intervals?

When you saw the weighing machine marking a fat gain of 16 pounds within a period of two months, why did you simply ignore it? It should have shocked you into action. The least you can do is find out what your weight is now and what your weight should be!

You need to be careful about what you eat as it is directly and proportionately related to your blood pressure. I agree that ‘one has to be true to the salt,?but this does not hold true for you. You have to cut down on your intake of salt drastically, before your doctor tells you – no more salt! Avoid salty, and fried food. Adopt a diet that is low in saturated fat.

Two local remedies well known, to control high blood pressure are butter milk and lemon. Take butter milk regularly. It is good for both – low as well as high blood pressure. Lemon peel is also equally effective in high blood pressure. A shredded lemon peel may be added to soups and stews or sprinkled over your salads.

And tell me, have you stopped drinking or are you still contemplating the decision? If you have already made that decision, then let me congratulate you. But, if you think that you can not do it all at once, reduce the intake of alcohol. Just take a drink a day. If you are already under the watchful care of your family doctor, please follow their instructions sincerely. Let there be no holidays for the medicine and please keep sufficient stock in advance. If your doctor has called you this Sunday for a check up, then make sure that you reach there this Sunday itself and not, the next Monday.

Also, the doctor must have given you certain indications about the schedule of exercise that is necessary for you, such as, morning walk, light stretching exercises or light aerobics. Follow the schedule strictly. Your doctor treats hundreds of patients like you everyday. He has more practical wisdom about high blood pressure, than you. Go as per his advice and understand his treatments.

Regular check up of blood pressure is a must. You need to have such an arrangement at your home. Charts of your regular checkups will help your doctor tremendously in treating you. Let all the members of your family, your wife, and your children go for the check up, along with you, even if they do not have this ailment.

If you are taking basic precautions like controlling your diet and doing proper exercises – keep aside all imaginary worries and live a normal, relaxed life!

Nature Made Cholestoff, Value Size, 120-Count

By , December 14, 2014 8:31 pm

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Cholesterol Care Supplement – All Natural Cholesterol Health Support Formula (3 bottles/180 Tablets)

By , December 14, 2014 4:17 pm

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